The Difference Between Strength and Power

Strength and power, as much as the two sounds similar, are actually very different. 

If you’ve had an argument in the gym, the ring or even the bar that the two cannot be interchanged, you’ll be happy to know that you’re not in the wrong. 

Strength and power, although are often used as synonyms are far from it and when we dive into the definitions – it’s easy to understand the difference and how to measure the pair. We’ve compared and contrasted the two so that you don’t have to keep on googling and trawling the web. 

Muscle Strength

If we’re going to get scientific about it, muscle strength is defined as the maximum amount of force that a muscle can exert against a form of resistance in one single effort. This is what you expect from a traditional conversation about maximum strength and the one rep max effort.

Testing muscle strength is usually in the form of a variety of compound or olympic lifts with the maximum load in a single lift classifying muscle strength. Whether that comes in the form of maximum bench press, squat, deadlift or power clean, there’s plenty of exercises used as standards for measurements. 

Strength training is heavily weight related with a focus on low reps and numerous sets with personalized and custom training plans depending on the areas of strength improvements required. If the strength improvement is required for the squat for example, more heavy squats are to be cleverly implemented into a routine for development in the area. 

So put simply, strength is the maximum load that our bodies can press, lift or push for a single repetition. 

Muscle Power

Muscle power on the other hand is defined as the product of dynamic muscular force and muscle contraction velocity. When measuring power, the speed at which the muscle contracts is multiplied with the force is exerts.

With recent research from Tufts University, we now know that power is a much better indicator when compared to strength for a number of performance tasks and athletic movements. Power is required for every sport under the sun, whether that’s football, golf and even darts – to an extent. 

Training for power can include plyometrics such as depth jumps, hurdles, lateral hops etc. Of course power training does depend on the sport chosen and the requirements on the body that the specific sports request.  

Simply put, power is the combination of force and speed and so does require strength to be more effective.

The takeaway

To conclude, strength is the maximum load that can be lifted, pushed or pulled for a single repetition whereas power is the speed at which muscles contract multiplied by the force produced. Power therefore requires strength to be effective and to build movements in athletic performance. 

Training for strength requires a clever implementation of low rep, high set exercising with a focus on compound movements. When focusing on power, bodyweight and lower weight plyometrics with speed can be implemented into a routine for improvements in power.

Why Use A Foam Roller: The Benefits & Effects Foam Rolling Has On Our Body

Welcome to the 21st century – a time when gym equipment got a lot better. A time when everything is more compact, convenient and fitness-friendly. Nowadays, this type of equipment can cure all of the common fitness problems – including muscle soreness.

We have all experienced this type of soreness, commonly one or two days after an intense workout. One of the best answers to treating this muscle soreness, however, is a piece of equipment known as a foam roller.

Below, we are talking more about foam rollers and their benefits.

The Benefits Of Foam Rolling

Also known as self-myofascial release, foam rolling is a technique that transformed the fitness world – with many professional athletes, coaches and therapists recommending it as a form of exercise for people of all fitness levels.

The truth is, foam rolling is like flossing. Even though you know that you should do it regularly, you are probably not doing it – or doing it only when you notice an issue such as muscle soreness.

However, before you beat yourself up for this, you should know that using recovery tools like the foam roller helps you clean out some of the lactic acid that is building up in your muscles during exercise. This, according to many experts, is what helps your muscles and your entire body to get away from the tension and prevent injuries from coming.

On top of this, foam rolling is great because it can improve your hamstring flexibility and balance. It can also decrease the exercise fatigue and help you get away from the muscle soreness in the first place.

So, while reaching for your foam roller is something you should definitely do – making this a habit before and after your exercise is even better. A regular foam rolling practice can also help you lengthen your muscles and turn off the overworked ones – tuning your body in a perfect balance and amazing obliques.

Why Use A Foam Roller Before Exercise?

We already mentioned that foam rolling is great for both before and after exercise. However, if we have to pick (for the sake of time), we would advise you to get your foam roller ready before exercise.

The truth is, foam rolling prior a workout can help you decrease the tension and density in your muscle. This will result in a better warmup, and you will also be able to help your muscles recover from the exercise you did the day before.

The right amount of time for you and your foam roller is 5 to 10 minutes, during which you will properly hydrate the tissue before the exercise – resulting in a greater range of motion and giving you a more supple preparation for your exercise.

And the best part?

Foam rolling doesn’t require much. All you need is that compact foam roller and no other fancy recovery tools to reap all of the benefits.

3 Quick Foam Rolling Exercises (Before You Go)

Now, the most interesting part. Below, you can find the three perfect foam rolling exercises ideal for any pre-workout scenario.

1. Kneel and roll – Position your roller parallel to your shoulders and put it below your knees while sitting on them. Make sure that your shoulders, elbows and wrists are aligned and carefully roll back and forth to massage your shins.

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2. Crossed calf – Start by sitting on your back with your hands pressing the floor firmly. With your legs outstretched, your foam roller should be below them while you are pushing your backside up and off the mat (without sinking into your shoulders).

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3. Chest opener – Ideal for chest workouts, this warm-up exercise with a foam roller is all about keeping the roller vertical and making sure that your head and tailbone are fully supported.

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A Final Word

At the end of the day, foam rolling is one of the simplest – yet most effective ways to help reduce the tight and sore muscle feeling more quickly than anything other.

So, we believe now is the right time to get your foam roller ready and start rolling!

Organize Your Process

 

Have you started working towards the goals you have set for yourself? If you followed my advice on the Lee’s Fitness Unlimited Podcast, the answer is yes. As I’ve mentioned in the “Organize Your Process” episode, the first step of putting action behind your goals is to write them down. Ok, so now you have your notepad with your goals written down. Now next to each goal write down five key factors that will contribute to your success.

Consistency is the key to successfully accomplishing your goals. Every day the objective is to take one of the five key factors and focus on improving in that specific area. For example, if your goal is to lose some weight around your stomach and mid section, your five factors of success might look like this:

    1. Get with a workout partner
    2. Do more cardio
    3. Eat with a better diet
    4. Do more core strength training
    5. Focus on recovery




Let’s start the list by getting with a workout partner and having another source of accountability. It is good to have someone to train with to push you to go harder when you would normally consider giving up. Feel free to bring your training partner to one of my boxing or fitness classes!

Next is to start doing more cardio. Go for walks, jog, run, or try going on hikes. If you need extra motivation to get into your cardio training mode, this would be a great opportunity to include your training partner.

Day three would be focused on sharpening your discipline with your diet. It is important to educate yourself about your diet and understand the nutritional facts about the foods you eat. You can also use this day to remove a unhealthy food from your diet for that day. If you can successfully go without a certain food craving for one day, it can become a healthy habit for your lifestyle with repetition and consistency.

By day four you can start to focus more on building muscles, so you will focus on your strength training more. Try a new core strength routine or set a goal for the amount of sit ups that you want to rep.

On day five you should slow the pace down and focus on your recovery. Go get yourself a massage or spend some time stretching and soaking your muscles. It is very important for your body’s development that you understand how to allow it to recover from intense training sessions.

Do you see how productive you can be towards accomplishing your goals by simply writing them down?